Sad news

From Diego's website on Christmas Eve:
"We had plans to bring Diego home today but God had other plans. Diego went to be with our heavenly Father at 3:07 PM today. He fought so hard till the bitter end".
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Thank you for the prayers and concern that you have shown for this lovely family.

Bloomin' computer

It turns out that it might not have been paranoia. Our hard drive crashed. I'm hunting high and low for all our software disks and will hopefully be back online soon, but my parents are visiting, so keep your expectations low... If you could see the state of the cupboard that I think the disks might be in, your expectations would be very low indeed...
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Merry Christmas!

2 down, 1 to go and a superhero mask

Baby blanket #2 of 3 is finished. Why does it always take at least an extra week for me to get around to tying up loose ends after finishing any knitted or crocheted projects? As for baby blanket #3 (for the baby boy due in March), it just needs a border.
I don't know which to give to which sister-in-law yet. The colour choices are so different and I keep changing my mind about it.
nb. This blanket started off as brown and aqua, as the yarn shop didn't have any girly colours at all in stock. Then a friend told me that, despite the girly pattern, it still looked like a boy's blanket, so I went back to the yarn shop and found hot pink. Hot pink is never going to figure on my favourite colours list, but I decided that if I only did a few rows with the hot pink I would be able to look at the blanket without wearing sunglasses or feeling slightly nauseous.
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I've also made another apron, but strictly speaking that's for a December birthday, not Christmas, and my little boy is not around to model it (same fabrics as last time), so you'll have to wait to see that one.
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Here is some more quick Christmas crafting, though:
My kids are big fans of dress-up (although my little scrapper of a daughter is rarely to be found in a princess dress), so I made a couple of superhero masks for them as wee stocking stuffers. I used the same template as I did for her Robin mask (which is now missing).
(even superheroes get tired)
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Here's a badly drawn template if you want to make one:
Right click on the image to save it, then re-size it and print it off at the size you want (measure so that the eyes will be centre of the eye holes). Cut two of the mask shape out of some felt and then pin them together. Pin a strip of elastic cord between the felt on either side, then sew the two pieces of felt together following the edges of the mask / eye holes, catching the ends of the elastic when you sew the outer edges. I sewed the lines approximately 2mm or 1/16th of an inch in from the edges. Then trim any uneven bits of felt off with some sharp scissors.
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No time for a translation of the day today, I'm afraid: my husband's just got home and is about to find out that I've spent my time on the computer instead of catching up with my Christmas to-do list and the laundry. I guess my morning of procrastination has come to an end. Take care all.

Over to you

I've been really busy, um, well, procrastinating lately, so I haven't got any of the handmade Christmas gifts to show you yet. Instead, here's a fabric barn I made a few weeks back.I made this one for these people (I can't wait for this book to come out - I have a bad habit of buying wee bits of sale fabric...). There are some people who have been busy, though. There have been lots of fabric dollhouses added to the UK lass in US flickr group lately: 1. Home Sweet Home, 2. Fabric Barn, 3. farmhouse front, 4. Travel Doll House with People
1. Fabric Dollhouse, 2. Fabric playhouse, 3. fronthouse, 4. Inside
1. Dollhouse, 2. Fabric dollhouses 3. Country cottage, 4. Dollhouse
1. Dollhouse, 2. casinha, 3. Fabric barn, 4. Open the door......
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Wow. Please post a picture there if you do make one using the tutorial. I am loving seeing all of the different ideas.
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Here are a couple of links to other ones that aren't in the flickr group:
Tiny pink cottage
Spotty dollhouse
Little yellow house
Blue cottage
Yellow dollhouse
Fairy garden
Rally the troops
Barn
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A couple of people have asked how long they take to make. Well, I'm pretty slow at sewing and they tend to take me about 2 evenings (ie. after the kids go to bed). I prep and cut the first evening, then sew it the second. The size is pretty compact, so you might want to enlarge the pattern. As long as the height is shorter than the width, you will be able to construct it the same way. Otherwise you'll have to make it in one piece (ie. sew the cross shape out of a single piece of fabric). Hmm, I can't remember what other questions have been asked, but feel free to email me at UKLassInUS@gmail.com if you do have any questions - or if you want to make them to sell to others.
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Translation of the day:
UK English: sultana = golden raisin (larger than currants, but smaller than normal raisins) in US English
There probably isn't a great distinction between the 3 types of dried grapes, but that didn't stop me from searching my supermarket shelf in vain for sultanas. Nope, didn't get around to baking my Christmas Cake yet...

Ornaments, as promised

I've seen a couple of things crocheted with wire recently, so I thought I would experiment with crocheting a mini wreath out of garden wire.
It's ok, but not as sweet as these mini wreaths made by my kids (ages 5 and 3) using buttons. I tied the bows for them. There's a tutorial on Martha Stewart's site.
Then I knocked out some wee felt ornaments (just two pieces of felt sewn together) to fill up the tree a bit.
We might have enough to fill the tree with handmade ornaments, once the previous years' efforts are thrown on, too.
Hopefully my husband won't come home early from work tonight, as I treated myself to some mince pies and now I'm in the mood to start putting up the decorations. I might even get around to baking the Christmas Cake this weekend.
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Whoa. I'm scaring myself now. This is not my usual procrastinating style. I'd better slow down before I start saying crazy things like "and then I'll write my Christmas cards so that they get to the UK on time"...
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Some good news about Diego: an x-ray has shown some improvement in his lungs. The bad news is that it looks like it is illegal to have an online raffle in California, so I'm going back to the drawing board for ideas.
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Translation of the day:
UK English: Mince pie = a sweet pie served at Christmas that contains mincemeat. Way back when, it used to be a spiced meat pie, containing some fruit, hence the name. These days it's just dried fruit and suet. Not a ground meat pie. Very tasty. I just had two.
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I had better get going: my husband came home early. *Sigh*

Hopefully she'll be a better cook than I am

My husband has already started asking me when he can use the computer to play his bloomin' computer game and I only logged on two minutes ago...
We just got back from my niece's 6th birthday party. Here's the wee apron I knocked out to go with the cooking for kids book that we gave her. Don't look too closely: I was still working on it an hour before the party was due to begin, so it's not the best topstitching I've ever done...

It's reversible - cupcakes on one side, pink squares on the other. I'm going to make a similar one for another niece, although I'm thinking of making a couple of changes to my basic idea. It was a nice and easy project, though. Hm, I wonder for how much longer my son will be willing to model pink aprons for my blog?
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The good news is that the smoky haze has cleared (I don't know who suffers more, the stir-crazy kids or me being stuck in the house with stir-crazy kids) and the weather is cooling off a little around here. I can finally wear jeans instead of shorts. It's still hard to get in the mood for the holidays when I don't even need a jumper (sweater) yet, though.

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The kids and I did sit down yesterday to make some ornaments (I'll show you next time) so hopefully things will start feeling more festive around here soon. I think I'll start decorating soon after Thanksgiving. I need some physical reminder that Christmas is fast approaching if I'm going to get started on Christmas present making...
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Translation of the day:
My sister-in-law's sister reminded me of this one today:
UK English: fag = cigarette in US English
UK English: faggot = a kind of meatball or a bundle of sticks in US English
US English: faggot (and the shortened form 'fag') = disparaging term for a homosexual man
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British folk tend to know the American translation, so this is more for the benefit of the Americans amongst you, so that you don't get offended when Brits 'pop outside for a fag' or offer you faggots for dinner...
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The bad news: one of the recent updates my friend posted on the site about 5 year old Diego: "Sorry I did not update yesterday. We needed to speak with family first. Diego may have some pneumonia but the main problem is the tumors in his chest have grown considerably. We have had some tough choices to make and for now we are going to continue fighting. He continues to have high fevers, heart rate and respiration. I will update when I can."
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I've been wanting to do something for them, besides occasionally subjecting them to my awful cooking. I am considering making a fabric dollhouse and doing some sort of online raffle for it to raise some money to go in the non-profit fund, but when I have contacted paypal for more details on the fees and charges that would be made against (hopefully) lots of small online payments, they have only sent an impersonal reply requiring that I have a paypal account and link my question to that account. I was wondering if any of you have had much experience with using paypal - or other forms - to receive payments, especially low monetary value ones. My e-mail address is over there on the left, if you want to contact me directly. Would people even be interested in winning one?
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Any other ideas would also be welcome. How any parent endures what they are going through, I don't know.
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Take care.

Aeroplanes and airplanes

Hello. Did you ever watch the Terminator movies? Remember how the machine became self-aware, decided that humans were a threat and decided to exterminate them? Do you think it's overly-paranoid on my part to wonder if my computer has become self-aware and then decided to just have some fun at my expense, just for giggles?
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My e-mail has gone a little nutty. People aren't always getting my messages, I'm not always getting theirs. When I have had a spare few minutes online, my feed reader has displayed a lovely colourful design and told me that service is temporarily unavailable - yet, when I am too busy to check it, it opens right up. Yahoo groups keeps teasing me that nothing is new, even when I know that is a downright lie. Even my new mouse likes to randomly highlight things and delete them - it double clicks on everything. Oh, and my camera battery charger died.
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That's the one complaint I have about my camera: you can not just buy a ready-charged battery for it at a shop. However, if you do live in Southern California, I definitely recommend buying a Nikon. After days of frantically searching for a receipt while envisioning my camera parts getting lost in the post (and ordering my kids not to do anything cute or clever while I was unable to record it) I found out that their repair facility is in El Segundo (by LAX). It was rather nice to just swing by and have a lovely lass just hand me a new charger on the spot. Thank you, Nikon.
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That doesn't completely excuse my lack of blog posting, but I haven't had much time this week. I've been holding wee babes, for starters. My newborn niece came to town for a visit and, remember those inconsiderate in-laws that weren't finding out the sex of their baby? They had their baby and it is another new niece for me. I hadn't realised how long it had been since I had last held a tiny baby - still, it's quite reassuring that I didn't get any daft ideas about wanting more kids...
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So blanket #3 is now cast on. Blanket #2 (for the nephew due early next year) just needs a border. I'm about to start the second of the two dollhouses that I'm making for others. I'm thinking of ideas for a couple of Christmas presents. But all I have to show you is my guilty pleasure: a scarf I'm knitting for myself, just because I felt like doing some knitting. The stitch pattern is from the boyfriend scarf in Last Minute Knitted Gifts. Book found at my local library, which was rather surprising, as I had thought that they had a policy of no craft books published since the bad 1970s hair days...

My camera is working, but new pictures will have to wait. The orange hazy glow from the sun is drenching everything, the air hurts to breathe, and the ash is floating down slowly like tiny snowflakes. I hope these recent wildfires are extinguished soon, without any loss of life.
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Translation of the day:
I usually try to avoid using certain words, in an attempt to stop this blog appearing in the results of dodgy google searches for distinctly non-craft-related sites. But these translations wouldn't be much use if I didn't at least make a feeble attempt to prevent you from making some rather embarrassing remarks to your neighbours on the opposite side of the Atlantic.
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For instance, when my American cousin visited us in England many years ago and playfully asked his 2 year old daughter 'where is your fanny?' , he probably was expecting a few gentle chuckles when his daughter put her head between her knees to look for it. Instead there was silence and a few worried looks being exchanged between the English company present.
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UK English: fanny = um, female body part, um, that begins with 'v', um, (still trying to avoid those google search results) female genitalia (clear now??)
US English: fanny = bum or buttocks in UK English
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In case you were wondering, no, the British do not call those wee pouch bags 'fanny packs'- we call them 'bum bags'.
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And if we were naming a plane, this probably wouldn't be a name we would chose:
And if we did, we wouldn't add a picture of a wee pig-tailed girl, unless we wanted the local police to suddenly be very interested in our whereabouts...
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Take care all.

Na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na

Batman!
and Robin!It's my little Dynamic Duo all dressed up for Hallowe'en.I really was lucky with finding fabric on sale for these 2 costumes - together they only ended up costing about $5, if you include the mask bought for 98 cents a few years back. I love it when the things that you are making are so tiny that you only need a quarter of a yard for a pair of shorts and sleeves. Actually, make that $6 - I did need to buy a new spool of black thread. Please don't look too closely at the pictures - they're designed to only last the one night...
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I did go into a little bit more detail than I had planned, though, as unfortunately my kids got hold of the pictures that I was using for inspiration. Suddenly I was getting all sorts of instructions and opinions, such as how the spikes on the arms were an essential part of the costume etc. Still, I saved some money, had two happy kids AND they lasted the night (which was actually touch and go - I used some bias tape handed down to me by my grandmother-in-law. I don't know how old the stuff was, but it was starting to disintegrate even as I sewed. Thank goodness it held itself together...)
I was a little nervous when my son bumped into other Batmans (batmen?) last night. I did wonder, is he going to look at their costumes, with their muscles and cool lines, and start thinking that he would have preferred one like that? But it turned out that he was pretty chuffed with his costume. Maybe I've got another year to go before my kids think the store-bought ones are cooler.
Here's our little jack-o'-lanterns. It turns out that those wee pumpkin carving saws, that you can buy at the supermarket for 50 cents the day before Hallowe'en, are wonder tools. Oh my, I'll never use vegetable knives / saws / steak knives / pen knives (pocket knives) / blunt butter knives again. I might even try a more interesting design next year, too
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Translation of the day:
UK English: chuffed = happy with, pleased, satisfied in US English
Make sure that you use the correct tense - it has all sorts of meanings when used without the '-ed' on the end...
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PS. Pictures taken indoors with bad lighting thanks to the rain - that only lasted the 5 bloomin' minutes that I was taking photos...

Diego

I feel a little nervous about tempting fate, but I know several families that go through so much hardship, that, when I'm having a rough day, I can always think of them and realise how lucky I am.
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Overnight lives can change, and just like that, your main purpose in life can change to that of a caretaker, researcher and advocate, all while dealing with your worst fears that you might - or will - lose a loved one.
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I lost an uncle to MND (Lou Gehrig's disease) back when I left for the States. I've already mentioned my little cousin that died recently. One of my in-laws had to have several brain surgeries about 4 years ago, that left her with balance and fine motor skills problems (ie. she can not walk unaided and things like writing or knitting are a struggle). A friend has a child with Angelman syndrome. Even my own parents had to deal with a child with TB (fully recovered now). The list goes on and on. And, of course, there's my friend whose child has cancer.
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Not only have they had to fight disease and illness, I've also had to watch them fight to get the resources that they need, the care that they need, the therapies that they need - and I keep wondering, why hasn't anyone made it easier? Why should a family going through this type of nightmare have to worry about anything other than their loved one? Especially here in the States, where we pay so much into health insurance, yet, without fail, everyone that I know that has needed care above and beyond the usual, has had to make multiple calls to their insurance to try to get it.
There's a paragraph or two in my sidebar about Diego. He's the 4 year old boy who has been fighting cancer since 2006. It did come back this year and he had to have his arm amputated. Then it showed up in his lungs and he also had to have yet another surgery this month to remove tumours in his brain. The great news is that a recent chest x-ray shows that the chemo is working!
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The not-so-great news is that their insurance officially denied their treatment at that hospital, telling them that they are responsible for a bill that is, at last count, $55,000. This is a family that has been careful with money - they bought a house that they could afford, taking a loan that was $100,000 less than what they qualified for, they do not have car payments - they own their cars, they go camping for their vacations.
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I'm a worrier. We've had unexpected car repair bills this year and ended up getting our bathroom redone, as the plumbing and electrical work had to be done anyway. What with the higher food prices, petrol (gas) prices and our utility bills all increasing their rates lately, I've been worrying about money being a little tight around here lately. But that pales in comparison to getting the news that you are responsible for a $55,000 bill - on top of all the other expenses that this disease has cost them.
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nb. His mum has finally been convinced to set up a non-profit fund to help with medical costs. I'll have no idea if any of you do donate, so there certainly isn't any pressure here, but just in case you would like to make a tax-deductible donation, the info is over there in the sidebar, as is a link to his caringbridge website, that his mum keeps updated with his progress.
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My daughter might have scribbled over my mantlepiece with a crayon, I might be putting off visiting the dentist until my savings account looks a little healthier, it might be quite a while before we can get the money together for a visit home, but I know how lucky I am.

1 down, 2 to go

One baby blanket finished, two to go. I'm thinking that I'll give them all as Christmas gifts, as one sister-in-law is inconsiderately not finding out the sex of her baby until the birth. Does she not realise how slow I am at crocheting???
One of the reasons that I am making these blankets is that each of the great-grandchildren so far have been given a baby blanket by my grandmother-in-law, but her arthritis doesn't allow her to pick up a crochet hook these days. The problem with this, though, is that she was great at crocheting, so I fear these new additions to the family are going to feel a little, um, short-changed if they compare theirs with the older cousins' blankets... Ah well. At least these can be used as the functional blankets - you know, the one that you don't worry about when your baby spits up all over it.
Sorry that this is a bit of a scribble and run type post, but I've been struggling to stay on top of things these last few weeks. Little tasks keep eating up great big chunks of my day, leaving me with a never-ending to-do list. Nope, haven't started the Halloween costumes yet*.
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Translation of the day:
UK English: rubbish = trash / garbage in US English. Yep, I know I've mentioned that one already, but it occurred to me that talking rubbish does not mean the same thing as talking trash. From what I understand, talking rubbish is talking nonsense, while talking trash is more along the lines of insulting someone (sometimes good-naturedly), especially those on an opposing team.
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For instance, when my new niece says, "why has my sister got a beautiful blanket, when all I have is this rubbish?", you might consider her to be talking trash about my crocheting ability, but she wouldn't actually be talking rubbish...
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PS. *If those of you with blogs could do me a favour and post less often, that would be a big help. When I actually manage to get on the computer, my blog reader keeps not loading - or won't load pictures if it does load. I'm way behind. That and you're making me look bad...
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PPS. Sorry for the shadow on the pic, both sunlight and my camera battery were running out on me.

Autumn

Well, it's been a week of plastering, feeling ill, plastering while feeling ill, with the usual mum duties thrown in. The bathroom is now ready to be painted, at least. Why my husband was so intent on chivvying me to get to this stage, I don't know, as it doesn't look like any painting will happen for another week or so. Why I couldn't have been left to lie in bed and feel sorry for myself, is beyond me.
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As for the computer, it has only been seen in the form of a blue glow around my husband's head, as his gaming forum has had political turmoil this week, apparently requiring his constant attention. I did offer a solution for him, consisting of explaining to the forum's members that, 'it's JUST A GAME'...
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Hopefully it's all sorted now, as I haven't been able to check my e-mail in days. I'm just letting you all know that I'm still alive, then I'm off to tidy the house (guess who was supposed to have been preventing the kids from trashing the house while I was sanding down the bathroom. And yes, my daughter did give herself a haircut while her father was glued to the PC). Hopefully I'll get to my e-mail tomorrow evening. Someone did suggest that I get my own PC, but maybe a new husband might work out cheaper. Hmm, I'll have to crunch the numbers...
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While I'm sure that you're stopping by purely to read about my computer game addicted spouse, there are a couple of things that I've made. It's been a while since I've shown you some knitted things. Number one is a scarf - the yarn was on sale for 50 cents and bought solely because I liked the grey / green colour. Luckily there was just enough for a scarf for my daughter as I'm not usually a 'fluffy' type and goodness knows what else I could have made with it.
Number two is a baby shrug from Debbie Bliss' book 'Simply Baby', which I made a little while back, but I don't think that I have previously mentioned (edit: you can now download this pattern for free from here). It's a great pattern for a beginner like me: nice and easy and it doesn't take up a lot of yarn or time. I think that the only change that I would make would be to make the sleeves a little narrower next time.
Ok, I had better stop procrastinating and go and clean the house.
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Today's translation of the day:
UK English: Autumn = Fall / Autumn in US English. I don't think that the English ever use the term 'Fall', but I think that some Americans do say 'Autumn'.
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I do know that England doesn't tend to have daft over 100°F weather in Autumn. Thank goodness it's cooling off a bit here. I really ought to move to a place that has a winter...

The scarf still isn't finished...

My six year old cousin died unexpectedly last week. He was disabled and autistic, but had managed to learn how to walk and feed himself. The difference that I saw in him between visits home had been amazing to behold. I can't begin to imagine what my poor uncle and aunt are feeling.
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I did attempt a little sewing (knits...), but gave that up early on, when it came time to get the seam ripper out (the lining and the outside of the sleeve were the same material, so it was really pretty easy to sew the sleeve on inside out while my brain was off doing its own thing...).
My children's great-grandma had a fall and broke her ribs, so she has been an unexpected house guest for a few days.
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So, I picked up some crocheting to keep my hands busy while I curled up on the sofa watching children that hadn't finished their dinner get spoiled by an old lady carrying M&Ms...
There's something therapeutic about crocheting a simple blanket. This one's a pushchair (stroller) blanket for one of the expectant mothers in the family on my husband's side. Three out of four sister-in-laws are pregnant right now. The nearest yarn shop didn't have much of a selection at all, but I didn't have time to search further afield. So, it was this or hot pink. I hope that she likes it.
It's using the same stitch pattern as the rhubarb scarf, but it wasn't until I loaded the photos onto the PC that I realised how similar they look when there is nothing in the photo to give a clue as to scale. The paler colours on the blanket are more cream coloured in real life, but the camera really picked up on the coloured strands mixed in.
Yep, still got a long way to go on the scarf...
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Take care all.

Lazy crayon roll tutorial

I made this crayon roll in the hopes of giving a little cheer to my friend's son, who has just started up with chemo again. I'm hoping that he still likes dinosaurs...
I have seen lots of crayon and pencil rolls on blogs and always thought that one would make a nice wee gift for a young child. . .nb. for some reason I tend to search for tutorials after I have made something, to see if I have made it correctly, rather than before, which would make far more sense... I did decide to make it a little different from the ones that I have seen so far, though. If you take a look at this photo, you'll notice that you can't see the stitched lines separating the crayon pockets. I do like the look of the stitched lines, but this way I can make it a little quicker, as I don't have to be so careful about making the stitched lines even and neat. Hence, this isn't a new idea, by any means, but this is the lazy version of the crayon roll.
I made this one for the triangular crayons, which are a little larger than normal crayons. I sandwiched one between two scraps of material and decided that 1" wide pockets would be a good fit. Normal crayons would probably need just ¾" wide pockets. I'll use the measurements for 16 larger crayons in the tutorial, but at the end you will find the approximate measurements for a crayon roll of 24 crayons (see italics).
For 16 large triangular crayons:
1. Cut out
...........1 18½" by 5½" rectangle of the exterior fabric
...........1 18½" by 5½" rectangle of interfacing or flannel
...........1 18½" by 12½" rectangle of the interior fabric

2. Measure 5½" down from the top of interior fabric rectangle and draw a horizontal line (A to B). Fold the fabric along this line so that the right sides are facing. The slightly larger side should be on top.
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3. Mark a horizontal line (C to D) 3½" up from the fold (A to B), then mark parallel vertical lines from this line to the fold every inch along the rectangle (shown by red dotted lines). Sew along these lines.
4. Fold the front half of the fabric down along line C to D, covering the lines that you have just sewn.
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5. (Iron on the interfacing to the wrong side of a fabric rectangle if you are using interfacing. If using flannel place the exterior and interior fabrics right sides facing on top of the flannel) Line up the interior and exterior rectangles right sides facing, pinning a small elastic hairband to one of the short sides. Sew around the edges using a ¼" seam allowance (as shown by the red dotted lines), leaving a gap on the final short side for turning. Make sure that you catch the edge of the elastic loop when you sew that end.
6. Turn it right sides out, press, then top stitch around the edge. This will close the opening.
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7. Put the crayons in their pockets, roll it up, then sew on a button at the point that the elastic loop reaches. Done.

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For 24 regular crayons:
The smaller rectangle will be about 20½" by 5" (24 crayons multiplied by ¾" pocket width, plus an additional inch for either end plus ½" seam allowance)
The larger rectangle will be approximately 20½" by 11½" . Measure 5" down to make line A to B, then measure 3 ¼" up from that fold to mark line C to D. To mark the parallel pocket lines, start one inch from the left edge, then mark every ¾" across, until you have 1" left.

You can use a ribbon to tie it, instead of a button and loop - just catch the ends of the ribbons as you sew the edge.
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Tell me if you have any questions or if you notice any glaring errors. The friend that I attempted to teach algebra to can attest to the fact that I am not any good at explaining things. I'd have taken pictures as I made it, but I thought, 'oh, that's an easy thing to explain', apparently forgetting that it would be me attempting to explain it...
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Translation of the day:
UK English: revise = study (usually before an exam) in US English
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As in, I think I might be dragging out my old maths books and doing some revising soon, if my 5 year old son is already bringing home geometry homework...

Off to school

I hope that you haven't been feeling neglected. As soon as September hit, my calendar suddenly became a mass of black ink. I've only snatched the odd minute online here and there.
My son started school last week - and now his little sister has started preschool. Both kids went happily into their new classrooms without so much as a backwards glance. Couldn't they at least look a little upset to leave me?? As for me, I had thought that I might be skipping and dancing out the door and off down the street (I don't get much time away from the little darlings), but I was surprisingly nervous about my son's first day. I wasn't one of the mums - or the one dad - that was crying, though. I'm guessing that they have regular babysitters...
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My son has 2 football (soccer) practices a week. Full uniform and football boots (cleats). Meanwhile these 5 year olds struggle to remember which goal they are aiming for. Tch. In my youth, the goals were just a pair of jumpers (sweaters) thrown on the grass and everyone would be wearing their falling apart trainers (sneakers). And I had to walk to school in the snow...
I haven't been making much. We're re-doing the old bathroom right now. Fun. So, all I've got for you is a needle case.
Yep, I've finally made a new home for all my needles that were usually to be found swimming around the bottom of my 'sewing stuff' box, while their original foil keeper deteriorated. I didn't want anything too twee, so these wrap-around notebooks were just the inspiration I needed.
Oh well, I had better get going. Hopefully I'll be catching up on my e-mails in the next couple of days. I have had a couple of people mention that I don't have my e-mail address posted. Well, that was in case you turned out to be a bunch of nutters. You've been very nice to me so far, though, so I've set up an e-mail account for the blog, that should link to my usual one - in theory at least. It's over there on the left, or on my profile (nb. I can't contact you back regarding comments if your blogger profile isn't activated or if you don't have your e-mail posted on your profile).
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Translation of the day:
I struggled to come up with an equivalent for this one, so this is what an online search came up with:
UK English: Twee = affectedly or excessively dainty, delicate, cute, or quaint / overly precious or nice / nauseatingly cute or precious / kitsch
These all sound a little too harsh, in my opinion. I just meant that I like simple and functional a lot of the time - things that aren't too fussy.
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Take care all.